ORTC and WebRTC Consulting

  

Hookflash is now providing WebRTC and ORTC Consulting services.

Professional Services Pack

For organizations looking for an expert ORTC / WebRTC developer to provide assistance or become a part of their teams for specific projects. Depending on your needs, the Hookflash subject matter expert can help with any aspect of your project, including consulting, design, development, and QA. The PSP (Professional Services Pack) is available in increments of 40 hours. We have streamlined the engagement process for the PSP to enable a quick start.

Complete Project Development

For companies needing specific development expertise or staff augmentation, we offer complete life cycle development services, including use-case definition, requirements specification, estimates, project planning, design, development, QA, and app store deployment.

Where we shine: C++ (low level, client and server), Assembler (eg. CODEC enhancement), Mobile development: Objective-C (iOS) , Java (android) and Server: Node.js

For more information please visit Hookflash or call 1.855.HOOKFLASH (466.5352) ext.2

W3C ORTC CG Meeting 7

22 January 2015 Editor’s draft:
http://ortc.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/ortc.html

Changes from the October 14 Editor’s Draft:

WebRTC 1.0 compatibility

  • Statistics API Update (Issue 85)
  • H.264 parameters update (Issue 158)
  • Support for maxptime (Issue 160)
  • RTCRtpUnhandledEvent update (Issue 163)
  • Support for RTCIceGatherer.state (Issue 164)

ORTC Library – Introduction

Object RTC (ORTC) is a free, open project that enables mobile endpoints to talk to servers and web browsers with Real-Time Communications (RTC) capabilities via native and simple Javascript APIs. The Object RTC components are being optimized to best serve this purpose.Our mission: To enable rich, high quality, RTC applications to be developed in mobile endpoints and servers via native toolkits, simple Javascript APIs and HTML5. It is also a mandate that Object RTC be compatible with WebRTC.

The Object RTC initiative is a project supported by Hookflash, Microsoft, Google and others. The ORTC C++ Library is a project maintained by Hookflash. To sponsor ORTC Lib projects send an email to sales@hookflash.com

Do you really want a dual MTI video codec for WebRTC?

H.264 AVC for WebRTC VP8 - Webm

Update: There is now some healthy conversation in the IETF WG around what “compliant” and “compatible” actually mean. More on this as it unfolds.

We are now in the final throes of a consensus call in the IETF around which video codec should be made mandatory for those building WebRTC apps, services et al, who wish to be considered “WebRTC Compliant”. The codec contenders are VP8 and H.264, in many forms and combinations.

This latest consensus call is for both codecs to be mandated for all WebRTC endpoints, or “dual MTI codec”. I am sure I will catch hell from someone on language but that is the essence of it. As one might expect, there are some that are in favor and some that are against a dual MTI video codec. Those in favor seem motivated to accept this based on the promise of interoperability that might follow and other reasons. As one might expect, we are all quite eager to put this debate to bed so we could get on with other work.

This is not a decision that should be made lightly. Let’s consider the implications. Imposing a dual MTI suggests that every developer that wishes to produce a WebRTC compliant app must implement both codecs.

Coming from a co-founder of an RTC toolkit vendor I can tell you that this does not sit very well with me, nor others in the WebRTC WG. One glance at the thread comments should provide some insight.

I find it difficult to agree to mandate a dual MTI codec knowing that there are a great many developers who will not want or will be in a position to implement both codecs. Yes, many WebRTC SDK vendors will support both. Even if both codecs and their transports are provided as part or could be easily added to the application at compile time it doesn’t mean that every developer will want to implement or ship both codecs.

Bottom line is, according this consensus, if developers do not implement/ship both codecs they are not considered WebRTC compliant. To me, this seems like a rather unreasonable expectation. Developers should be able to choose which codec they ship, and not be forced to do 2x the work to become compliant.

I would love to hear from other developers on this. Do you plan on implementing both VP8 and H.264 in your apps?

ORTC Interview: webrtchacks’ Chad Hart & Robin Raymond #webrtc

webrtcH4cKS: ~ ORTC is not the “Other” RTC: Q&A with ORTC CG Chair Robin Raymond

Char Hart of webrtchacks.com interviewed ORTC Chair – Robin Raymond on a range of topics. Excerpt:

Biggie vs. Tupac. Gates vs. Jobs. Apple vs. Samsung.  Nothing catches people’s attention for no legitimate reason like a feud. Unfortunately this isn’t just a celebrity phenomenon. Feuds have been endemic even to real communications as well. From the very beginning, Elisha Gray’s dispute with Alexander Graham Bell over the original telephone patent showed the industry has a propensity for squabbles…

Read the rest here…

What’s a WebRTC app, exactly?

nojitter - what is a webrtc app

Dave Michels (Journalist: Nojitter, Talkingpointz) recently posted this article pondering what makes a WebRTC app, a WebRTC app.

It touches on some interesting points, namely “a WebRTC app is not defined by its wrapper.” Here is an excerpt from the post..

Google Chrome was the first browser to support WebRTC, and most of the new applications rely on Chrome in order to be plugin-free. Other browsers that support WebRTC include Mozilla Firefox and Opera. These browsers use much of the same code, yet compatibility issues exist because Chrome has considerably more capability than what’s specified in the WebRTC specification….

Read the entire article here..

2014 WebRTC & ORTC Events – Fall / Winter Schedule

September

  • Sept 30 – Oct 2 / Chicago – IIT Real-time Communications Conference
    (For me, this is “the” objective gathering of the brightest technical minds in the RTC space.) Robin Raymond will be speaking on ORTC / WebRTC 1.1 and also Cloud + P2P Communications.

October

  • 30-31 Oct / Santa Clara – W3C TPAC / WebRTC WG Meeting
    (W3C Technical Plenary / Advisory Committee Meetings Week which includes WebRTC Working Group meetings. This should be a rather interesting set of meetings for the WebRTC WG, for a variety of reasons.)

(tba) Oct ? / Web – W3C ORTC Community Group Meeting

November

December

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